St Mary’s Church, Rostherne, Tatton, Cheshire

Rostherne Church near Tatton Hall, Cheshire.

A remarkable monument to Charlotte Lucy Beatrix Egerton by Richard Westmacott (1775-1856).

Charlotte Lucy Beatrix Egerton drowned 10 November 1845, the day before her wedding, aged 21, in the Rostherne Mere; the church is overlooks the mere. Unknown whether accident or deliberate; suicide.

A very fine sculpture.

There are three sculptors named Richard Westmacott: grandfather, father and son. This is the work of the middle, perhaps best known, Richard Westmacott.

The church full of other monuments including two more Westmacott’s; the son rather than the father or grandfather.

 

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Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour had the same mtDNA!

Family trees are commonly represented from the male perspective. Presenting family trees from the female perspective occasionally identifies relationships that aren’t always apparent.

The History Database has a number of Maternal Family Trees that show descent only through the female line. Mitochondrial DNA, or mtDNA, is passed from mothers to their children; men don’t pass mtDNA on.

In transpires that Anne Boleyn and Jane Seymour, the latter having usurped the former in Henry VIII’s affections both shared the same mtDNA. So did their children Elizabeth I and Edward VI respectively. The progenitor of the line is Eleanor Vitre from Brittany, died 1233. She married William 2nd Earl of Salisbury. Their daughter Ela married William Longespée 3rd Earl Salisbury.

The maternal line continues through numerous families: Bourchier, Darcy, Grey, Fitzherbert, Boteler, Strange, Cockayne, Seymour, Cromwell and Howard to name some of the most prominent.

Jane Seymour inherited her mtDNA from her mother Margery Wentworth and her grandmother Anne Say.

Anne Boleyn inherited her mtDNA from her mother Elizabeth Howard and her grandmother Elizabeth Tilney.

And, of course, before Eleanor Vitre, her mother was Emma of Dinan (Brittany), whose mother was Eleanor of Brittany (aka Penthièvre which is in southern Brittany) whose mother was Hawise of Guincampe, which is in northern Brittany.

The line appears to have ended with the two daughters of Dorothy Sidney, Dorothy and Penelope, neither of whom appear to have had daughters, and Jane, the daughter of Mary Boyle, who didn’t have issue.

 

Monument to Ralph Fitzherbert, Norbury Church

Monument to Ralph Fitzherbert and his wife Elizabeth Marshall at the Church of St Mary and St Bartok, Derbyshire.

Finely made in Chellaston alabaster of the fifth or early Tudor period

His effigy notable for being the only remaining with the boar of Richard III on his Yorkist suns collar. Bobbed hair with finely detailed ringlets. No facial hair. Head resting on a mantled tournament helm with right handed clenched fist crest; Fitzherbert. Feet resting on a lion with a beadsman beneath the right foot.

She wearing the butterfly headdress with a tight collar with an ‘agnes dei’ (lamb of God) pendant.

The chest finely made with weepers on the three extant sides. On one side five single men (a knight, a monk, two merchants and one unknown), and one couple. On the other side women, four single, two duos.

Ralph and Elizabeth had twelve children, six male, six female so probable the weepers represent their children, possibly with spouses, possibly with offspring since in the two females duos there is a noticeable difference in height.

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Monument to Robert Charles John Manners, Chapel, Haddon Hall

A very fine sculpture of the boy Robert Charles John Manners, 1886-1895, first son of Henry 8th Duke Rutland and his wife Violet Lindsay, who died aged nine of an acute stomach condition.

Violet Lindsay spend thirty years sculpting the base of the monument, possibly also the effigy too although it is so fine as to probably be the work of a professional such as Alfred Gilbert (who was summoned to take the death mask), possibly George Frampton whose monument to Lady Isabel Wilson in St James Church, Warter is of a similar quality.

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The arms on the base of the monument represent the Manners and Lindsay descent.

The Manners arms originally Or, two bars azure, meaning Gold (Yellow) background with two blue (azure) horizontal bars.

Henry VIII allowed the augmentation of the arms with the arms of England in chief (meaning at the top) reflecting the descent from Edward III as a result of George Manners, 11th Baron Ros Helmsley, having married Anne St Leger whose mother was Anne of York (elder sister of Edward IV and Richard III) whose father was Richard 3rd Duke York whose father was Richard of Conisburgh, 1st Earl Cambridge, whose father was Edmund of Langley, 1st Duke of York, whose was the son of Edward III.

Other arms include:

Ros. Robert Manners married Eleanor Ros, heiress of Thomas Ros, 9th Baron Ros Helmsley.

Neville. Henry Manners, 2nd Earl Rutland, married Margaret Neville, daughter of Ralph Neville, 4th Earl Westmoreland.

Charlton. John Manners, 4th Earl Rutland, married Elizabeth Charlton.

Carey. George Manners, 7th Earl Rutland, married Frances Carey.

Montagu. John Manners, 8th Earl Rutland, married Frances Montagu.

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Photos less than ideal since I wasn’t carrying my usual camera; these taken with a phone.

 

 

 

 

St Mary’s, Staindrop, County Durham

It was a visit to St Mary’s Church, Staindrop, County Durham, that sparked my passion for photographing church monuments combining history and sculpture.

Staindrop contains the tomb of Ralph, 1st Earl Westmoreland, and his two wives: Margaret Stafford and Joan Beaufort.

What I hadn’t known before my visit is that it also contained the tomb of William Harry Vane, 1st Duke Cleveland,  sculpted by Richard Westmacott; one of his finest works.

Tomb of William Harry Vane, 1st Duke Cleveland

William Harry Vane, 1746-182, a great great grandson of King Charles II. William Harry’s paternal grandfather Henry Vane, 1705-1758, married Grace Stewart, the daughter of Charles Stewart, 1st Duke Southampton, the illegitimate son of King Charles II and Barbara Villiers, 1st Duchess Cleveland, 1640-1709.

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Effigy of William Harry Vane, 1st Duke Cleveland, 1766-1842, at St Mary’s Church, Staindrop, County, Durham. Sculpted by Richard Westmacott.

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The arms of William Harry Vane being Vane: three gauntlets sinister (left) indicating either illegitimacy or attainder, and Charles, Duke of Grafton, illegitimate son of King Charles II England differenced by a baton sinister to indicate illegitimacy.

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Ralph Neville, 1st Earl Westmoreland

Ralph Neville, 1st Earl Westmoreland, 1364-1425, the progenitor of the Neville family as a result of his having 22 children, 73 grandchildren, 153 great grandchildren and 211 great great grandchildren. A number only exceeded by John of Gaunt.

Ralph’s first wife Margaret Stafford, 1364-1396, was his second cousin once removed and his fourth cousin. They had eight children together.

After Margaret’s death in 1396 he married Joan Beaufort, 1379-1440, granddaughter of Edward III. She and Ralph had fourteen children together.

Given the number of descendants it is not surprising that some were Lancastrians and some Yorkist during the Wars of the Roses:

John, Baron Neville, 1410-1461. Lancastrian. Killed at Battle of Towton.

Humphrey of Brancepeth, c 1439-1469. Lancastrian. Beheaded.

Charles -1449 brother of Humphrey). Lancastrian. Beheaded.

Ralph Dacre, 1st Baron Gilsland, 1412-1461. Lancastrian. Killed at Battle of Towton.

John “Butcher” Clifford, 9th Baron Clifford, 1435-1461. Lancastrian. Killed at Battle of Dintingdale.

Roger Clifford, 1447-1485. Beheaded.

Richard Neville, 5th Earl Salisbury, 1400-1460. Yorkist. Beheaded after Battle of Wakefield.

Richard “Kingmaker Neville, Earl Warwick and Salisbury, 1428-1471. Yorkist and Lancastrian. Killed Battle of Barnet.

His descendants also include King Edward IV, King Richard III, King Henry VIII, King Edward VI, Queens Mary and Elizabeth, and all of the English and British monarchs since James I King England.

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Memorial to Sophia Poulett

Sophia being the wife of William Harry’s son Henry, 2nd Duke Cleveland.

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Richard Redman, 1350-1426, All Saints Harewood

Another of the six fine chest tombs at All Saints, Harewood: Richard Redman, 1350-1426 and his wife Elizabeth Aldeburgh, died 1426.

Soldier and High Sheriff he campaigned with Richard II in Ireland. In 1405 he was commissioned to fine members of the gentry associated with the rebellion by Henry Percy, 1st Earl of Northumberland. He was, briefly, Speaker of the House of Commons during the eight day Parliament that voted supplies to continue the war in France shortly after the Battle of Agincourt in Oct 1415.

His armour of Period III: Lancastrian or Early Plate. An Esses collar although interwoven with another device. Moustache. Bascinet with orle. Helm with horses head crest; no mantling. Eagle buckle on belt. Feet on lion.

She wearing an elaborate crespine headdress.

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Edward Redman, 1510, All Saints, Harewood

Another of the six fine chest tombs at All Saints, Harewood.

Edward Redman, died 1510, and his wife Elizabeth Huddlestone.

He originally a supporter of York, in particular Richard III. He was subject to the general pardon issued by Henry VII after the Battle of Bosworth.

Edward and Elizabeth had four children only one of whom, Henry, had a child: Joan who married Marmaduke Gascoigne, son of William Gascoigne.

He wearing armour of Period V: Early Tudor. Simpler, reduced fluting. The pauldrons formed from one smooth plate with a bold projection to protect the neck, typically larger on the left. A Tudor collar of Esses and Roses combining the SS of Lancaster and the White Rose of York following the marriage of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York. Shaved, hair “bobbed”, longer than in Period IV, comes down to the shoulder. Head resting on a helm with mantling and a fine crest of what appears to be a dogs head.

She wearing a simple  headdress with veil falling low on the shoulders.

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